Last edited by Monris
Monday, August 3, 2020 | History

2 edition of Ypres and the medieval cloth industry in Flanders found in the catalog.

Ypres and the medieval cloth industry in Flanders

Ypres and the medieval cloth industry in Flanders

archaeological and historical contributions = Ieper en de middeleeuwse lakennijverheid in Vlaanderen : archeologische en historische bijdragen

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Published by Instituut voor het Archeologisch Patrimonium in Doornveld .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Flanders,
  • Ieper (Belgium),
  • Belgium,
  • Brussels
    • Subjects:
    • Textile industry -- Belgium -- Brussels -- History -- Congresses.,
    • Flanders -- History -- To 1500 -- Congresses.,
    • Ieper (Belgium) -- History -- Congresses.

    • Edition Notes

      Other titlesIeper en de middeleeuwse lakennijverheid in Vlaanderen, Ypres, Ieper
      Statementedited by/redactie Marc Dewilde, Anton Ervynck, Alexis Wielemans.
      GenreCongresses.
      SeriesArcheologie in Vlaanderen., 2
      ContributionsDewilde, Marc., Ervynck, A., Wielemans, Alexis., Instituut voor het Archeologisch Patrimonium (Belgium)
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHD9865.B43 B78 2005
      The Physical Object
      Pagination206 p. :
      Number of Pages206
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL6850384M
      ISBN 109075230133
      LC Control Number00355489
      OCLC/WorldCa59435973

      During the Middle Ages, Ypres was one of the most powerful towns of Flanders, with a flourishing cloth industry that rivaled those of Ghent Ghent, Du. Gent, Fr. Gand, city ( pop. ,), capital of East Flanders prov., W Belgium, at the confluence of the Scheldt and Leie rivers.   The In Flanders Fields Museum, the region’s most important, is housed in the rebuilt Cloth Hall that sits on Ypres’s pleasant town square. (Ypres is the French name for this city of 35,

      During the Middle Ages, Ypres was one of the most powerful towns of Flanders, with a flourishing cloth industry that rivaled those of Ghent Ghent, Du. Gent, Fr. Gand, city ( pop. ,), capital of East Flanders prov., W Belgium, at the confluence of the Scheldt and Leie rivers. Connected with the North Sea by the Ghent-Terneuzen Canal. years of expansion led not only to the development of the cloth industry in Flanders, but also to that of the Flemish towns, whose popula-tion eventually contained more than 50 per cent of the artisans of the cloth industry.2 During the same period the grasp of the merchants on the industry became ever tighter. In the beginning they.

      studying the vocabulary of the medieval cloth industry in northern France. Mr. Reviews of Books cloth trade, since Flanders and Artois were the centers for the production of Philip the Good of Flanders, dated , granting Ypres and a few other towns. Ypres Cloth Hall, Ypres. likes. The Cloth Hall is a large cloth hall, a medieval commercial building, in Ypres, Belgium. It was one of the largest 5/5(4).


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Ypres and the medieval cloth industry in Flanders Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Ypres and the medieval cloth industry in Flanders: archaeological and historical contributions = Ieper en de middeleeuwse lakennijverheid in Vlaanderen: archeologische en historische bijdragen.

[Marc Dewilde; A Ervynck; Alexis Wielemans; Instituut voor. Get this from a library. Ypres and the medieval cloth industry in Flanders: archaeological and historical contributions = Ieper en de middeleeuwse lakennijverheid.

[Marc Dewilde; Anton Ervynck; Alexis Wielemans; Instituut voor het Archeologisch Patrimonium.;]. Get this from a library. Ypres and the medieval cloth industry in Flanders archaeological and historical contributions ; [papers of the international symposium. The 11th to 13th centuries were a golden age for the medieval Flemish cloth industry.

And then the English introduced their crippling wool tax. Flemish cloth has a long history of being admired. When the Romans entered Belgica, the Ypres and the medieval cloth industry in Flanders book cloth woven by the locals was soon taken and used for a man’s toga and a woman’s stola.

In the early Middle Ages, records exist of Flemish cloth. The making of cloth. State of the art technologyin the Middle Ages Sorber F. Sheep-breeding and wool production in pre-thirteenth century Flanders and their contribution to the rise of Ypres, Ghent and Bruges as centres of the textile industry Verhulst A.

include JCR data (impact factor, subject category and rank) Cancel Export. Create search list. Boone, Marc. Social conflicts in the cloth industry of Ypres (late 13th-early 14th centuries): the Cockerulle reconsidered).

In Marc Dewilde, A. Ervynck, & A. Wielemans (Eds.), Ypres and the medieval cloth industry in Flanders: archaeological and historical contributions (Vol. 2, pp. Zellik, Belgium: Instituut voor het Archeologisch Patrimonium. Title: From war to peace archery and crossbow guilds in flanders c by laura crombie(), Author: Davy Goedertier, Name: From war to peace archery and crossbow guilds in flanders c The Cloth Hall, called the Lakenhalle in Flemish, is located in the centre of Ypres.

“Laken” is the Flemish word for a type of high quality woollen woven cloth. During medieval times the Cloth Hall was the commercial heart of the city in its role as the place where the trading of cloth and wool was carried out. The Cloth Hall (Dutch: Lakenhal/Lakenhalle) is a large cloth hall, a medieval commercial building, in Ypres, was one of the largest commercial buildings of the Middle Ages, when it served as the main market and warehouse for the Flemish city's prosperous cloth industry.

The original structure, erected mainly in the 13th century and completedlay in ruins after artillery fire Country: Belgium. A. Verhulst, “Sheep-breeding and wool production in pre-thirteenth century Flanders and their contribution to the rise of Ypres, Ghent and Bruges as centres of the textile industry,” in Ypres and the medieval cloth industry in Flanders: archaeological and historical contributions, vol.

2, M. Dewilde, A. Ervynck, and A. Wielemans, Eds. Ypres used to be a very important center for the cloth industry. The Cloth Hall served as a covered sales and storage place for cloth, woven mostly with wool imported from England and Scotland.

Today the building is occupied by the 'In Flanders Fields museum' which more than deserves your visit. Download this stock image: Cloth Hall Ypres Belgium market warehouse industry medieval trade city Renaissance Gothic - C8M9DE from Alamy's library of millions of high resolution stock photos, illustrations and vectors.

9 Stabel, P., ‘ Guilds in late medieval Flanders: myth and reality of guild life in an export-oriented environment ’, Journal of Medieval History, 30 (), –at 10 Kittell and Queller, ‘“Whether man or woman”’, 64, 98– Best quality wool from England The cloth towns of Flanders - Bruges, Lille, Bergues, and Arras in Artois - were closely linked with England by the trade in raw wool.

The damp island to the north produced excellent fine wool, but lacked the skilled craftsmen to make the finest quality cloth. Flanders. Antwerp; East Flanders; Flemish Brabant; Limburg; West Flanders; Wallonia. Brabant Wallon; Hainaut; ‘ypres-cloth-hall’ Published Ap at × in The Rise and Fall of the Medieval Flemish Cloth Industry ‹ Return to post.

Looking forward to your comments Cancel reply. Enter your comment here. Ypres Cloth Hall. The Cloth Hall in Ypres was one of the largest commercial buildings of the Middle Ages, when it served as the main market and warehouse for the Flemish city's prosperous cloth industry. The original structure, erected mainly in the 13th century and completedlay in ruins after artillery fire devastated Ypres in World War I.

Ypres is a Belgian municipality in the province of West Flanders. Though the Dutch Ieper is the official name, the city's French name Ypres is most commonly used in English. The municipality comprises the city of Ypres and the villages of Boezinge, Brielen, Dikkebus, Elverdinge, Hollebeke, Sint-Jan, Vlamertinge, Voormezele, Zillebeke, and Zuidschote.

Together, they are home to ab Community: Flemish Community. Flanders. Antwerp; East Flanders; Flemish Brabant; Limburg; West Flanders; Wallonia. Brabant Wallon; Hainaut; ‘Ypres cloth hall’ Published Ap at × in The Rise and Fall of the Medieval Flemish Cloth Industry ‹ Return to post.

Looking forward to your comments Cancel reply. Enter your comment here. Currently reading Janet Abu-Lughod's book Before European Hegemony: The World System A.D. I just finished the chapter talking about the rise and fall of the textile industry in Flanders in the 13th and 14th centuries.

Among the reasons she cites is the dependency of textile workers in the Netherlands for English wool exports. A revisionist look at the revolt in Bruges and Ypres is Marc Boone, “Social Conflicts in the Cloth Industry of Ypres (Late 13th-Early 14th Centuries): The Cockerulle Reconsidered,” in Ypres and the Medieval Cloth Industry in Flanders (Ypres, ), pp.

–; another is Agatha Ann Bardoel, “The Urban Uprisings at Bruges, –1.The Cloth Hall (Dutch: Lakenhal/Lakenhalle) is a large cloth hall, a medieval commercial building, in Ypres, Belgium.

It was one of the largest commercial buildings of the Middle Ages, when it served as the main market and warehouse for the Flemish city's prosperous cloth nates: 50°51′04″N 2°53′09″E / .As the industry grew, so did the towns.

"Rural weavers, spinners and fullers migrated to Bruges, Ghent and Ypres where the burgeoning cloth trade was centred," says Professor Marc Boone, Professor of Medieval History at the University of Ghent.

"A major acceleration occurred when weaving underwent a technological revolution in the 11th century.